Category Archives: communicationshape

VRedhype (vee-ar-ed-hipe)

Introduction

What follows is the product of ‘s Hypothes.is Aggregator. Find more info here on how it works and how to install on your WordPress blog.  I annotated a recent Audrey Watters post about the history and hyperbole surrounding Virtual Reality hardware and software.

It’s a bit of a mess on my end at this stage, but what you are seeing is Shaffer’s plug-in gathering all of the annotations with “VRedhype” tags.  If you are like me, when you are working in the margins you don’t take time to tag.  Well…time to unlearn the old and learn the new.  Advice to self: tag this stuff.

The next question is simply, “How do I curate this mess and, inevitably, why bother?  Next, wouldn’t it be fine to get some playful response from the author? Fourth, how do I integrate (or should I even bother) this into  the centrifuge of knowledge that seems to spin ever on and ever faster?  In the spirit of infinite play I can dismiss all of these questions and party on, but as a teacher who wants to share the wealth with my fellow learners…I gotta curate and share.

Part One

Here is what you get when you run this through the Hypothes.is Aggregator plug-in on this site.

No hypothes.is search terms provided.

(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

VR will be a new and unique “empathy machine.”

This was the first one I saw that wasn't the equivalent to a rollercoaster. It did make me empathic where I had not been before. https://youtu.be/ecavbpCuvkI

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

that the positive benefits of going on actual field trips

I don't know whether IRL field trips are much benefit either.

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

Educational Stereoscopy

[Who knew?](http://jaredjared.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Bendis-Stereoscopy.pdf) [Who knew?](http://www.stereoscopynews.com/hotnews/3d-cinema/education/3727-use-of-stereoscopy-in-education) [Who knew?](http://goo.gl/AdZpBT)

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

The Sword of Damocles,

https://youtu.be/43mA_ypfwKg?t=1m18s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISJWZpFIAlQ

Curated by tellio.



VRedhype (vee-ar-ed-hipe)

a recent Audrey Watters post

[Join us here on Audrey's page](https://goo.gl/yBNB3Q). Remember that this is someone else's field. Be playful and be kind, but be true and honor the work with that truth.

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

seen record-setting levels of venture capital

Yes, a bubble. Wait for it. Wait for it. Just click your heels together and say to yourself, "Second Life, Second Life, Second Life." ![](http://data.whicdn.com/images/51913513/large.gif)

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

Horizon Reports

Prima facie evidence of the foolish practice of futurology. As Jesus said in The Big Leboski, "Laughable." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3_ww66EeN8

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

we’re still two to three years out from widespread adoption of VR.

I agree with N. Taleb that black swans are only retroactively predictable. I always predict that it will always be something else. I am always right.

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

Virtual simulations promise that learning experiences can be undertaken more safely (and sometimes more cost-effectively).

I recall my most recent introduction to VR was one of the early NYT attempts. This one showed a food drop in Sudan. I really felt something new with that VR video. I felt empathy because I was surrounded (something I could see AND feel around me) by folks who were racing to get at the parachuting food palettes drifting down and landing. The point being that the experience was embodied. For some small percentage of people VR is incredibly embodied--they get very powerful motion sickness.

Curated by tellio.



Student Data, Algorithms, Ideology, and Identity-less-ness

ideology, inequality, and higher education, with a specific focus on for-profit education through the lens of race, class, and gender

That's a lot spinning plates.

Curated by tellio.



Student Data, Algorithms, Ideology, and Identity-less-ness

be posting the video-recording soon.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CJzIXG0T1A

Curated by tellio.



Student Data, Algorithms, Ideology, and Identity-less-ness

More importantly, more urgently, is this "trick" being hard-coded, hard-wired into the infrastructure of our schools?

Of course, schools have ever been tools and it all depends on who has grabbed the handle. Well...who? Wanna get used? Go to school and be a tool.

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

the erasure of embodiment

I have no idea what this means. I need more context, more examples, more 'embodiment'.

Curated by tellio.



Part Two

There is another way to aggregate my tag, “VRedhype”. Run it through Jon Udell’s machine instead.  It retains more here and looks a bit like the Diigo Outliner. He explains more in his happily lucid post for Hypothes.is.

That version is below this text.  It is considerably more coherent, but unlike Shaffer’s, there is more manual handling to be done, more friction. Now, Udell and Shaffer need to join forces and add Udell’s machine to Shaffer’s plug-in.

 

 

(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History 5

tellio 7/3/2016 5:54:27 AM gsLSikEMEeaAy3cKCTdJZQ

seen record-setting levels of venture capital
VRedhype

Yes, a bubble. Wait for it. Wait for it. Just click your heels together and say to yourself, “Second Life, Second Life, Second Life.”

tellio 7/3/2016 5:49:53 AM 3_ShHkELEeaPWX_nqFThdw

Horizon Reports
VRedhype

Prima facie evidence of the foolish practice of futurology. As Jesus said in The Big Leboski, “Laughable.”

tellio 7/3/2016 5:49:47 AM 3GsfZEELEeajTiN02SC12w

we’re still two to three years out from widespread adoption of VR.
VRedhype

I agree with N. Taleb that black swans are only retroactively predictable. I always predict that it will always be something else. I am always right.

tellio 7/3/2016 5:43:34 AM _Z-hLkEKEeag0FsWi4JVsA

Virtual simulations promise that learning experiences can be undertaken more safely (and sometimes more cost-effectively).
VRedhype

I recall my most recent introduction to VR was one of the early NYT attempts. This one showed a food drop in Sudan. I really felt something new with that VR video. I felt empathy because I was surrounded (something I could see AND feel around me) by folks who were racing to get at the parachuting food palettes drifting down and landing. The point being that the experience was embodied. For some small percentage of people VR is incredibly embodied–they get very powerful motion sickness.

tellio 7/3/2016 5:25:12 AM bOz2iEEIEeaT0CegFcCGJQ

the erasure of embodiment
VRedhype

I have no idea what this means. I need more context, more examples, more ’embodiment’.

Student Data, Algorithms, Ideology, and Identity-less-ness 3

tellio 7/3/2016 5:36:54 AM D6IFokEKEeanWKd_nht8lQ

ideology, inequality, and higher education, with a specific focus on for-profit education through the lens of race, class, and gender
VRedhype

That’s a lot spinning plates.

tellio 7/3/2016 5:36:08 AM 7M3PmEEJEeaEgYvethb9zw

be posting the video-recording soon.)
VRedhype

tellio 7/3/2016 5:34:20 AM s4_5LEEJEeabu3e5jRRnYQ

More importantly, more urgently, is this “trick” being hard-coded, hard-wired into the infrastructure of our schools?
VRedhype

Of course, schools have ever been tools and it all depends on who has grabbed the handle. Well…who? Wanna get used? Go to school and be a tool.

Conclusion

So what do we do with these tools that improve upon how we seek, make sense of, and share the world around us?

That would be an ideal question to pursue in the comments and the margins.

 

 

Work From Anywhere: 25 Cool Apps For Digital Nomads, Corporate Escapists, And Loony Adventurers — Life Learning — Medium

In the past 3 years, I have already run my business from Lebanon, Indonesia, Morocco, Iran, Kenya, and South Africa. Alw…

Source: Work From Anywhere: 25 Cool Apps For Digital Nomads, Corporate Escapists, And Loony Adventurers — Life Learning — Medium

Wow! I only use three of these tools with any kind of regularity. As I am considering some digital nomadism in the near future, then knowing these and knowing a writer who thinks so clearly about this is a nice find. But you don’t have to be a digital nomad in order to use any of these congenial tools.

My favorite one that I hadn’t heard of? Silvrback (https://www.silvrback.com/?ref=maqtoob). My favorite one that I use all the time? Canva (https://www.canva.com/?ref=maqtoob). #clmooc

Slow Viewing

 

 

forgodssakke

No, Charlie B, I will not shut up. In fact Charlie, if you don’t like it, turn around. It’s an experiment, only I am not going to use you for some vague research agenda. What I have found out over the last year is that asking people to give a damn is asking a lot. So this amounts to working out loud, for my purposes. If you get something out of it, well…I’d be surprised.

I am obsessed now and over the last few years about slowness. My last post was about slow living and slow learning. I live on a farm where it’s all about slow learning (unless a hawk is after a chicken and in that case the learning had better already be there for cluck’s sake).

The purpose of this post is to think and work out loud considering the concept of slow viewing. I take as my context Ze Frank’s recent talk about his work on Buzzfeed as president of their Motion Pictures division. I started watching the video on FORA (you may need to join to access the vid, not sure, but free) and I knew immediately that this was not something I could scrub through.  It reminded me of the awesome John Cleese video a few years ago on creativity where I did some very intent viewing. I needed to do a slow viewing.

Typically, I do slow viewing with the cloud  annotation tool, Vialogues.  Of late I have also been drawn to Thinglink’s relatively new video annotation tool.  For some reason I started annotating with neither one. I used les pense-bete, Post-It notes.

As I viewed Ze Frank’s talk, I started tacking them around the outer edges of my screen, but they weren’t the ultra sticky kind so the overhead fan kept blowing them off.  Plus, Frank’s presentation had lots of cool charts and I needed something more. I decided on grabbing screenshots and then put callouts on those shots in Snag-It.  That would fit my workflow quite nicely.

The best part of using a screencapture tool like SnagIt is that it forces me to slow down. I pause the video, grab the image, save it.    Folks like Charlie B are lightning fast and probably don’t need to slow down, to slow view, but I do need that pause to consider.

Videos resist slow viewing because they have continuity, a loop and flow that I am used to watching from start to finish.  I also tend to be a passive viewer of moving media. All of these characteristics militate against ‘reading’ video slowly.

At first I thought that others might be interested, perhaps Charlie B, but then I remembered–it is hard for folks to care and attend and read because they are going too fast. This is fussy, stop-and-go work unpacking video content, but the good stuff like Ze Frank’s presentation practically demands that treatment. It is rich and deep and complex and begs  to be explored, translated and annotated, even to be remixed and transformed.

And that is what I did below

howwebrandnowatbuzzfeed

 

 

 

But Charlie D says this makes no sense if I haven’t viewed the video.

buzzfeed approach to reach and impact

Exactly so, the purpose of annotation and slow viewing is idiosyncratic and personal. It might have value for you, but I know it has value for me. It slows me down to reconsider.

theexamplar

This post has been influenced quite a bit by Ze Frank but also by my recent work annotating Nick Sousanis’ graphic dissertation, Unflattening. In the former, I champion the idea Frank presents at the beginning of his talk: we are using images and video much as we used text in the Guttenberg Pause. And we have to acknowledge this in whatever discipline we happen to be working, learning in my instance. Actually, we’re all in the learning business. It is the parallel discipline for every practice. Frank’s talk is full of amazing resonance for learners and is worth slow viewing for that alone.

Sousanis’ influence is very similar. His book is an embodiment of Ze Frank’s idea above. Unflattening is an acknowledgement that the disseration as we know it may be insufficient for audiences post-Guttenberg Pause. And my slow viewing is also a recognition that we must do something more with video than passively take it in through the funnels of our eyes.

The real fun of slow viewing is that you begin to internalize some of the disciplinary habits of those you are walking with.  For example, in my SnagIt annotations I began to experiment with how I used the ‘callout’ boxes on the page by adopting some of the design principles I learned about in Sousanis’ work.  And I am looking at the “Sad Cat Diary” exemplar that Frank presents as a way to begin to look at how I “sell” folks on the CLMOOC “brand”.

So Charlie B, if you made it this far, it’s a miracle.  Here’s hoping you got something out of it, but in the end it doesn’t matter.  I wrote this in part for you, but  really this is just slow writing for me.  It is a form of intellectual and emotional occupation.  Like the Norman one, its likely effect is permanent, an inner tattoo on the mind.  What do you think of that, Charlie B?  Really? Damn you’re such a troll, but I love ya anyway.

anigif_enhanced-buzz-9459-1375200221-15

 

Whaddya Mean, You’re Closed?

I started the morning in control. Internet filters up, project in mind, ready to get to ‘done’. I wanted to work on my Scoop.It accounts because I have had some activity this week and felt duty bound to find some more good stuff for my peoples. I found some classic linkbait in my Scoop.It content box and decided to make short work of it. I mean, really, all the ads. I already know these tools, right?

hongkiat ads

Not so much it turns out. Take social bookmarking tool Kippt for example. Let me digress.

First, I did a quick skim of the author’s Twitter site which was handily linked at the bottom of the article. Not bad, I followed. I checked out his blog and while I did not agree with the sentiments of his hyperbolic post about Indian feminism, I had to say the guy has voice and is fun to read. So far, OK. Maybe I can give this post a chance.

A quick skim of the post had revealed lots of new tools. My curation filter, the one that says, “Only sign up for this if it gives an immediate hum.” I know. What a ridiculous filter, but I always start with a embodied bias. I listen for a feel, a synaesthetic rumble and taste.

I read the post text about Kippt and get that immediate dopamine squirm of discovery. Profuse sighs all about, I step down into the hyperlink and into Kippt land.

Here are my discoveries:

Visual, social bookmarking service
Pretty
Chrome extension
Bookmarklet
An RSS feed
Lots of associated apps including a WordPress widget

OK, so I sign up and discover…I have already signed up. What the hell. What made me forget I had already been here, done that? There’s a cogpsy research experiment in that I am sure, but I gloss over that and sign in with the first possible login that bubbles up into my frog pond mind. Voila. I am in.

I like to take the tool for a spin at this point so I created what the folks at Kippt call a “list”. In this case it is a list of Zotero tools for beginners in my English 300 Composition class. It seems just like Diigo except it is all pinteresty pretty. I find out there is not an embed share, but there is an RSS feed

Zotero 4 All by tellio - Kippt

0 Comments · 0 Likes › View on Kippt

Author: tellio
Posted: April 3, 2015, 11:22 am

0 Comments · 0 Likes › View on Kippt

Author: tellio
Posted: April 3, 2015, 11:19 am

0 Comments · 0 Likes › View on Kippt

Author: tellio
Posted: April 3, 2015, 1:37 am

0 Comments · 0 Likes › View on Kippt

Author: tellio
Posted: April 2, 2015, 12:32 pm

0 Comments · 0 Likes › View on Kippt

Author: tellio
Posted: April 2, 2015, 12:27 pm

0 Comments · 0 Likes › View on Kippt

Author: tellio
Posted: April 2, 2015, 12:24 pm

0 Comments · 0 Likes › View on Kippt

Author: tellio
Posted: April 2, 2015, 12:23 pm

So advantage to Kippt for having an RSS feed for every list. Very handy.

Then I discover…Kippt has been shutdown. I still have access to the site and can still create lists, but…apparently no one can view them except through the widget I set up. So all the spinning about was for no good reason? A couple of hours shot on a rainy spring morning?

I’m over it; however, if the author had done a proper curating job and checked out the availability of the tool, then I wouldn’t have been sucked into that maelstrom.

Now all that is left is to look at the rest of the post and linkbait and ask, “Do ya feel lucky?”