Category Archives: Scholarship in the Act

VRedhype (vee-ar-ed-hipe)

Introduction

What follows is the product of ‘s Hypothes.is Aggregator. Find more info here on how it works and how to install on your WordPress blog.  I annotated a recent Audrey Watters post about the history and hyperbole surrounding Virtual Reality hardware and software.

It’s a bit of a mess on my end at this stage, but what you are seeing is Shaffer’s plug-in gathering all of the annotations with “VRedhype” tags.  If you are like me, when you are working in the margins you don’t take time to tag.  Well…time to unlearn the old and learn the new.  Advice to self: tag this stuff.

The next question is simply, “How do I curate this mess and, inevitably, why bother?  Next, wouldn’t it be fine to get some playful response from the author? Fourth, how do I integrate (or should I even bother) this into  the centrifuge of knowledge that seems to spin ever on and ever faster?  In the spirit of infinite play I can dismiss all of these questions and party on, but as a teacher who wants to share the wealth with my fellow learners…I gotta curate and share.

Part One

Here is what you get when you run this through the Hypothes.is Aggregator plug-in on this site.

No hypothes.is search terms provided.

(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

VR will be a new and unique “empathy machine.”

This was the first one I saw that wasn't the equivalent to a rollercoaster. It did make me empathic where I had not been before. https://youtu.be/ecavbpCuvkI

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

that the positive benefits of going on actual field trips

I don't know whether IRL field trips are much benefit either.

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

Educational Stereoscopy

[Who knew?](http://jaredjared.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Bendis-Stereoscopy.pdf) [Who knew?](http://www.stereoscopynews.com/hotnews/3d-cinema/education/3727-use-of-stereoscopy-in-education) [Who knew?](http://goo.gl/AdZpBT)

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

The Sword of Damocles,

https://youtu.be/43mA_ypfwKg?t=1m18s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISJWZpFIAlQ

Curated by tellio.



VRedhype (vee-ar-ed-hipe)

a recent Audrey Watters post

[Join us here on Audrey's page](https://goo.gl/yBNB3Q). Remember that this is someone else's field. Be playful and be kind, but be true and honor the work with that truth.

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

seen record-setting levels of venture capital

Yes, a bubble. Wait for it. Wait for it. Just click your heels together and say to yourself, "Second Life, Second Life, Second Life." ![](http://data.whicdn.com/images/51913513/large.gif)

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

Horizon Reports

Prima facie evidence of the foolish practice of futurology. As Jesus said in The Big Leboski, "Laughable." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3_ww66EeN8

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

we’re still two to three years out from widespread adoption of VR.

I agree with N. Taleb that black swans are only retroactively predictable. I always predict that it will always be something else. I am always right.

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

Virtual simulations promise that learning experiences can be undertaken more safely (and sometimes more cost-effectively).

I recall my most recent introduction to VR was one of the early NYT attempts. This one showed a food drop in Sudan. I really felt something new with that VR video. I felt empathy because I was surrounded (something I could see AND feel around me) by folks who were racing to get at the parachuting food palettes drifting down and landing. The point being that the experience was embodied. For some small percentage of people VR is incredibly embodied--they get very powerful motion sickness.

Curated by tellio.



Student Data, Algorithms, Ideology, and Identity-less-ness

ideology, inequality, and higher education, with a specific focus on for-profit education through the lens of race, class, and gender

That's a lot spinning plates.

Curated by tellio.



Student Data, Algorithms, Ideology, and Identity-less-ness

be posting the video-recording soon.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CJzIXG0T1A

Curated by tellio.



Student Data, Algorithms, Ideology, and Identity-less-ness

More importantly, more urgently, is this "trick" being hard-coded, hard-wired into the infrastructure of our schools?

Of course, schools have ever been tools and it all depends on who has grabbed the handle. Well...who? Wanna get used? Go to school and be a tool.

Curated by tellio.



(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History

the erasure of embodiment

I have no idea what this means. I need more context, more examples, more 'embodiment'.

Curated by tellio.



Part Two

There is another way to aggregate my tag, “VRedhype”. Run it through Jon Udell’s machine instead.  It retains more here and looks a bit like the Diigo Outliner. He explains more in his happily lucid post for Hypothes.is.

That version is below this text.  It is considerably more coherent, but unlike Shaffer’s, there is more manual handling to be done, more friction. Now, Udell and Shaffer need to join forces and add Udell’s machine to Shaffer’s plug-in.

 

 

(Marketing) Virtual Reality in Education: A History 5

tellio 7/3/2016 5:54:27 AM gsLSikEMEeaAy3cKCTdJZQ

seen record-setting levels of venture capital
VRedhype

Yes, a bubble. Wait for it. Wait for it. Just click your heels together and say to yourself, “Second Life, Second Life, Second Life.”

tellio 7/3/2016 5:49:53 AM 3_ShHkELEeaPWX_nqFThdw

Horizon Reports
VRedhype

Prima facie evidence of the foolish practice of futurology. As Jesus said in The Big Leboski, “Laughable.”

tellio 7/3/2016 5:49:47 AM 3GsfZEELEeajTiN02SC12w

we’re still two to three years out from widespread adoption of VR.
VRedhype

I agree with N. Taleb that black swans are only retroactively predictable. I always predict that it will always be something else. I am always right.

tellio 7/3/2016 5:43:34 AM _Z-hLkEKEeag0FsWi4JVsA

Virtual simulations promise that learning experiences can be undertaken more safely (and sometimes more cost-effectively).
VRedhype

I recall my most recent introduction to VR was one of the early NYT attempts. This one showed a food drop in Sudan. I really felt something new with that VR video. I felt empathy because I was surrounded (something I could see AND feel around me) by folks who were racing to get at the parachuting food palettes drifting down and landing. The point being that the experience was embodied. For some small percentage of people VR is incredibly embodied–they get very powerful motion sickness.

tellio 7/3/2016 5:25:12 AM bOz2iEEIEeaT0CegFcCGJQ

the erasure of embodiment
VRedhype

I have no idea what this means. I need more context, more examples, more ’embodiment’.

Student Data, Algorithms, Ideology, and Identity-less-ness 3

tellio 7/3/2016 5:36:54 AM D6IFokEKEeanWKd_nht8lQ

ideology, inequality, and higher education, with a specific focus on for-profit education through the lens of race, class, and gender
VRedhype

That’s a lot spinning plates.

tellio 7/3/2016 5:36:08 AM 7M3PmEEJEeaEgYvethb9zw

be posting the video-recording soon.)
VRedhype

tellio 7/3/2016 5:34:20 AM s4_5LEEJEeabu3e5jRRnYQ

More importantly, more urgently, is this “trick” being hard-coded, hard-wired into the infrastructure of our schools?
VRedhype

Of course, schools have ever been tools and it all depends on who has grabbed the handle. Well…who? Wanna get used? Go to school and be a tool.

Conclusion

So what do we do with these tools that improve upon how we seek, make sense of, and share the world around us?

That would be an ideal question to pursue in the comments and the margins.

 

 

Writing Project Tech Pedagogy: Episode 14 (6/30/2016)

Often when you read tech pedagogy articles you get listicles. For example, you get “Top 10 Education Tech Blogs” or “The Best Ways to Use Padlet” or “7 Tools for Creating Classroom Blogs”.  All good stuff. Not complaining.  But I want to share how I am using tech not only in the classroom but professionally and personally.  What follows is one of those stories without lists.  And if you are open to it, you can annotate in the margins by going to this link which allows you to use Hypothes.is to comment on the sides.  I hope that conversation will be one part “director’s commentary” and reader’s zoo.

One of my favorite partners in creating is Kevin Hodgson.  In a recent post, “Resonation Points: Practicing Noticing and Connecting”, Kevin leapfrogged across a lily pad of ideas and spaces, distinctly non-listicle:

CLMOOC–>noticing–>Mary Ann Reilly’s  post “Love is a Story in Five Parts“–>using the app SUPER–>using the app Legend to pull out a notable quote from Wendy’s postcard project–>back to SUPER with a response to Anna via Melissa–>my shell game post–> a conclusion.

My name for these is ‘feldgangs’, field walks.  Imagine you personal learning network as a series of meadows with fervid hedgerow margins full of life and pastures, an ecosystem of nearly infinite complexity.  In a feldgang we pull out what we notice.  And what do we notice?  We don’t know until we go field walking. Or as Kevin says and I steal for a Pablo poster:

pablo (80)

I responded in Kevin’s comments:

Then I translated it into a poem

pablo (79)

Tech pedagogy has more to do with how you use your repertoire to make sense and create and share and reciprocate than it does with dazzling others with your technical capacity.  All of these tools are simple and derive from engaging with others online at the most basic level–text.  It all ripples out from there, from the comment and conversation and noticing what is happening on your feldgangs to the sharing and showing of the path.

Another way of thinking about it is what Nick Sousanis calls “unflattening” or what the writer James Scott refers to as “making legible” or what James Gray names “liminal thinking” or what Mike Caulfield offers us with Wikity and federated wikification or what Venkatesh Rao deems is ‘breaking smart’.

In other words all tech pedagogy and tech are about is helping us connect so that we can make and share meaning.  Pedagogy is learning turned inside out.  Tech pedagogy is just another way to turn ourselves inside out.  The reason we make a big deal about it is that it is a new way of doing and being that we pretty much suck at.  We are all just making one feldgang after another and coming back with a aptly round stone, a feather, a Solomon’s Seal dug up from the hedgerow and dirt under our fingernails.  If tech isn’t connected to life it is an inert idea, not even usefully dead like a possum that feeds a vulture or a blade of orchard grass hay from the pasture. I think it is more like setting a luna moth free.

 

 

 

A “making of” video by KQED about the layered ‘hybrid films” of Manu Mukherje…

In the latest episode of Art School, Mukherjee unpacks the narrative and details behind her newest piece, Home and the World, which examines cultural hybridity, the aftermath of colonialism, and feminist questions.

Only wish she could have gotten down to some of the nuts and bolts of her layering process. The video is worth watching on many levels including her chaordic studio. I love looking at all of her tools, how she has them at the ready, how idiosyncratic it all is, yet managing to work through to done.

You can also contribute to the conversation here if you wish with Vialogues. I am finding myself more and more using video annotation as a way to integrate image/sound/meaning in the unique medium that film and video are. I have taken my notes and put them here if anyone else wants a go at analyzing and curating what I have already done: https://paper.dropbox.com/doc/Collapsing-Colonialism-w-Manu-Mukherjee-NFCRTLY4aUUvlJajxwjxv

Source: A “making of” video by KQED about the layered ‘hybrid films” of Manu Mukherje…

Graphics as Public Space

I have been digging into Daniel Bassill’s work with the Tutor/Mentor Institute as a way to question, rethink, adapt and pirate his ideas about systems in organizations. I am essentially using the public spaces he has mapped graphically about his organization. My annotations are an occupation of his public space, a happy pirating for happy purposes.

For example, I used this graphic to ask questions and push our conversation forward, upward, downward, backward, and otherward. Part of the beauty of this work is its public nature, a commons for those who will have it or need it. It is the ultimate ‘potlatch’ and part of the gift culture that is pure Internet to the core.

CLMOOC-1

 

I used the Commons that Daniel created here as a happy pyracy (pyracy with two “Y”s  is self-defined as white hat skullduggery). Every time I post I assume that it is the creation of a public commons to be shared by as common pasture by all the “flocks” and “herds”.  I took Daniel’s image above as just that, a commons to use but not abuse.

2015-07-22_10-48-00

One moment I am a lamb gamboling in fresh white clover and another a serious old ewe stamping the ground in protective warning.  (I am a sheep farmer and you have to allow a certain amount of latitude here in my extending the pasture metaphor.)  I make a point that I am playing in the public commons of Daniel’s graphic as well as its margins, its metes and bounds, its interstices, its fence rows.

Here is a another commons, public and intended to be used by others, an organizational map that sums up the systemic work of Daniel’s organization, the Tutor/Mentor Institute.

Knowlege-Flow

I used this commons space to close read with a filter on it–facilitation.  In other words I am interested in creating a large system/organization with facilitation at its core much like what Daniel has done with putting tutor/mentoring at its core.  I pyrated his work by messing about with it in SnagIt–close reading it in SnagIt.  This kind of commons work forces one to be quite a bit more deliberate in considering.  I could have gone slower but I wanted to publish this new public space for him to get his reaction.  And I wanted my peers in #CLMOOC to see what I understand public digital space to mean.

2015-07-23_08-14-43

I have moved beyond comprehending Daniel’s work to apprehending it and finally toward appreciating it.  You come, too.

 

Game the Game: Unflattening and Leveling Up 4 Make Cycle 3

toodudecomixthegameisafoot

In modern literary criticism, stance is all. The beauty of that ‘stance’ is that it encourages us to do what Nick Sousanis calls ‘unflattening’. Sousanis in his unparalleled graphic comic of the same name defines this term thus,

Unflattening is a simultaneous engagement of multiple vantage points from which to engender new ways of seeing.(32)

In other words unflattening is a seeing machine, a way of generating a new way of seeing.

This week we are looking at a new way of seeing in #CLMOOC ‘s third week.  It’s called gaming.  When you unflatten you have to take one view and add another in order to the get the ‘parallax’ so essential to seeing something anew and with depth. Sousanis devotes a whole chapter to this so I devoutly hope you go buy his book and read more there. Suffice to say, whatever your vantage point you can combine it with ‘gaming’ to “level up”.

I have been trying to figure out how our Make Cycle compadres want us to do this.  There were so many calls to action in the newsletter I felt compelled to tease them all out in order to see with this gaming eye. In fact,  I am making a game of it.  In fact, I am inviting everyone to make a game of it. The Hackpad below has all the particulars which is to say few rules, few boundaries, much openness and an invitation to use the Creative Commons Piratical License (well, not so much a license as a guideline–do what thou wilt.)

I wonder if our facilitators realize that they created a proto-crypto-pseudogame in their own newsletter.  Now that would be a great game:  discover the game within the newsletter about the game.

“Come Watson, come! The game is afoot! Not a word! Into your clothes and come!”

Slow Viewing

 

 

forgodssakke

No, Charlie B, I will not shut up. In fact Charlie, if you don’t like it, turn around. It’s an experiment, only I am not going to use you for some vague research agenda. What I have found out over the last year is that asking people to give a damn is asking a lot. So this amounts to working out loud, for my purposes. If you get something out of it, well…I’d be surprised.

I am obsessed now and over the last few years about slowness. My last post was about slow living and slow learning. I live on a farm where it’s all about slow learning (unless a hawk is after a chicken and in that case the learning had better already be there for cluck’s sake).

The purpose of this post is to think and work out loud considering the concept of slow viewing. I take as my context Ze Frank’s recent talk about his work on Buzzfeed as president of their Motion Pictures division. I started watching the video on FORA (you may need to join to access the vid, not sure, but free) and I knew immediately that this was not something I could scrub through.  It reminded me of the awesome John Cleese video a few years ago on creativity where I did some very intent viewing. I needed to do a slow viewing.

Typically, I do slow viewing with the cloud  annotation tool, Vialogues.  Of late I have also been drawn to Thinglink’s relatively new video annotation tool.  For some reason I started annotating with neither one. I used les pense-bete, Post-It notes.

As I viewed Ze Frank’s talk, I started tacking them around the outer edges of my screen, but they weren’t the ultra sticky kind so the overhead fan kept blowing them off.  Plus, Frank’s presentation had lots of cool charts and I needed something more. I decided on grabbing screenshots and then put callouts on those shots in Snag-It.  That would fit my workflow quite nicely.

The best part of using a screencapture tool like SnagIt is that it forces me to slow down. I pause the video, grab the image, save it.    Folks like Charlie B are lightning fast and probably don’t need to slow down, to slow view, but I do need that pause to consider.

Videos resist slow viewing because they have continuity, a loop and flow that I am used to watching from start to finish.  I also tend to be a passive viewer of moving media. All of these characteristics militate against ‘reading’ video slowly.

At first I thought that others might be interested, perhaps Charlie B, but then I remembered–it is hard for folks to care and attend and read because they are going too fast. This is fussy, stop-and-go work unpacking video content, but the good stuff like Ze Frank’s presentation practically demands that treatment. It is rich and deep and complex and begs  to be explored, translated and annotated, even to be remixed and transformed.

And that is what I did below

howwebrandnowatbuzzfeed

 

 

 

But Charlie D says this makes no sense if I haven’t viewed the video.

buzzfeed approach to reach and impact

Exactly so, the purpose of annotation and slow viewing is idiosyncratic and personal. It might have value for you, but I know it has value for me. It slows me down to reconsider.

theexamplar

This post has been influenced quite a bit by Ze Frank but also by my recent work annotating Nick Sousanis’ graphic dissertation, Unflattening. In the former, I champion the idea Frank presents at the beginning of his talk: we are using images and video much as we used text in the Guttenberg Pause. And we have to acknowledge this in whatever discipline we happen to be working, learning in my instance. Actually, we’re all in the learning business. It is the parallel discipline for every practice. Frank’s talk is full of amazing resonance for learners and is worth slow viewing for that alone.

Sousanis’ influence is very similar. His book is an embodiment of Ze Frank’s idea above. Unflattening is an acknowledgement that the disseration as we know it may be insufficient for audiences post-Guttenberg Pause. And my slow viewing is also a recognition that we must do something more with video than passively take it in through the funnels of our eyes.

The real fun of slow viewing is that you begin to internalize some of the disciplinary habits of those you are walking with.  For example, in my SnagIt annotations I began to experiment with how I used the ‘callout’ boxes on the page by adopting some of the design principles I learned about in Sousanis’ work.  And I am looking at the “Sad Cat Diary” exemplar that Frank presents as a way to begin to look at how I “sell” folks on the CLMOOC “brand”.

So Charlie B, if you made it this far, it’s a miracle.  Here’s hoping you got something out of it, but in the end it doesn’t matter.  I wrote this in part for you, but  really this is just slow writing for me.  It is a form of intellectual and emotional occupation.  Like the Norman one, its likely effect is permanent, an inner tattoo on the mind.  What do you think of that, Charlie B?  Really? Damn you’re such a troll, but I love ya anyway.

anigif_enhanced-buzz-9459-1375200221-15

 

Case Studies in Rhizomatic Practice

I have been working at trying to identify what #rhizopractice might or might not look like.  I kept expecting some kind of look at rhizomatic practice (and we may yet get that), but this week seemed like a free for all so I decided to learn rhizomatically, medially, marginally, and disruptively as much as I could.  I have created a resource for trying to figure out what rhizomatic practice looks like both in and out of the #rhizo15 community.

My next step is to set up Case Problems where I ask #rhizo15 members to help determine through observation and discussion whether an example is or is not rhizomatic.  It is a crowdsourcing project.  Maybe I should put it on Kickstarter?

View Confessions on Hackpad.